Start learning something new: join our online courses!

Dear future cabin crew,

Although things can feel challenging, know that there’s a TON of opportunity right now for anyone that’s willing to be brave, dedicate his time to learn new things and fight for this dream!

….… and YES, that includes you 🙂

 So it’s time to start learning something new and useful and we got you covered!

We are very happy to announce the launch of our first ONLINE cabin crew interview preparation course!  As this pandemic keeps us locked in our houses for an uncertain period of time, let’s use our time wisely and make the first steps towards an aviation carer!

 

Many airline companies such as Etihad Airways, Emirates or Qatar Airways have adapted their recruitment process to the current situation and they are currently organising online video interviews as a method to preselect their future cabin crew. As you know, preparation is key so learning how to act during this type of interview and how to answer to all the questions the recruiters will ask you is CRUCIAL for your succes!

This online course will provide you with all the necessary tools to fully prepare you for all of the Cabin Crew recruitment stages and enhance your confidence.

The course runs for 2 weeks, 3 lessons per weeks and it’s delivered by highly experienced aviation trainers that will guide you constantly and teach you all you need to know about becoming cabin crew.

 

COST: 150 eur

WHEN: starting 13th April 

 

Ready to dive in? Here’s the link to access your guide: http://training.howtobecabincrew.com/onlinecabincrewcourse

Don’t delay in getting started, because your skills and courage are needed now more than ever befor. If you have any question, don’t hesitate to message us!

Always remember that this too shall pass!❤

 

Stay strong,

How to be cabin crew team

30-31 May, Madrid: Cabin Crew Interview Preparation Course

How to be Cabin Crew team will host a two day intensive training in Madrid, this March. Our course will prepare you for the various Cabin Crew applications and interview stages with major airline companies, ensuring you are successfully recruited as Cabin Crew.

Our course has been designed to expose you to what the airline recruiters are looking for when viewing potential candidates, so you can build your confidence and stand out of the crowd.

By attending the How to be cabin crew conference, you will:

•Gain a better understanding of the steps you need to take in order to apply for a cabin crew job

•Find out exactly what the airlines are looking for when they recruit

•Full training on how a cabin crew interview is structured

•Find out the flight attendant requirements in 2020

•Find out how to apply for a cabin crew job

•Learn how to make an impressive CV & pictures for the interview

•Gain an insight into the selection testing and interview process

•Prepare for typical airline interview English tests

•Practise all the stages of the interview

•Learn how to pass the one on one stage of the interview with simulated questions

•Dramatically increase your chances of being selected

• Learn about personal grooming and how to dress for your interviews

Our courses are the best choice!

Prepare for take off !

What will you learn during?

Our course will cover the following key areas to help you prepare for your cabin crew interview:

• Self presentation – how to stand out from the crowd 

• Behaviour – the right approach for all the tasks at the interview

• Team work – how to deal with group exercises

• Body language 

• Group activities – practice, not theory! 

• Final interview simulation

• Interview Q & A’s

• Individual feedback for each student

 

WHEN: 30-31 May

WHERE: Madrid, Sheltair Center Santa Teresa, Calle Santa Teresa 4

WHAT: How to be Cabin Crew 2 day intensive training

PRICE: 250 EUR / 2 day course

 

The How to be Cabin Crew course offers the future cabin crew the possibility to interact with highly experienced professionals in the aviation industry, discuss about their career plans and find out valuable information regarding the flight attendant job.

Book your seat now! Click here and fill out the subscription form

*limited seats

The How to be cabin Crew has significant experience in helping people like you to be successfully recruited as Cabin Crew. Our course is all you need to be successfully recruited by the airlines!

We train you, we hire you, we give you wings!

  • BOOK YOU SEAT AT GET YOUR WINGS WITH US!

How a job in customer service can help you become cabin crew?

Most airline companies don’t require people to have experience in aviation, but they expect that candidates have a series of qualities and skills that fit with the cabin crew requirements. Some of those are communication, teamwork, fast adaptability in emergency situations, client orientation, good time management, diplomacy and strong attention to details.

Furthermore, any previous experience in customer service is a big advantage in any candidate’s CV. That’s why we always advise our readers and students to gain some professional experience in this field. Jobs such as customer service support, sales, communications, social assistance, volunteering etc are a plus!

Practically, how could a job in customer service can help you in becoming a more valuable candidate for an airline company?

  1. You already know how to talk to clients, how to react in stressful situations and how to solve customer complaints.
  2. Recruiters see you as a responsible, mature person, who, although is young, wished to gain experience, to be financially independent and to exceed their limits. Just think about the difference from a person aged 20+ who already has in his CV a series of activities and experiences in the field (from part-time jobs or project-based jobs such as hostess, promoter, direct sales etc) and a person that has an empty CV. Which one will have more chances to be hired?
  3. You develop professionally and personally, you learn useful things; these kind of jobs usually come with certain training and communications courses which will teach you how to talk, how to look in a certain way, overcoming emotions, how to sell etc. So, you can have access to different development tools. Any course and access to new information are extremely important when you’re just beginning your career.
  4. You’ll be more confident when you’ll go to an airline interview. You’ll know how to smile more and how important posture and attitude towards the client are; a person who has worked as a promoter/hostess understands that smiling is the best way to gain client’s sympathy and the importance of a proper body language. All become part of your job, so it’ll be much easier to highlight these skills at the interview.
  5. During the final interview, you can easily come up with a series of examples from your professional experience. During the hiring process, recruiters will test you in order to see if you have the qualities you claim you have on your CV and how do you talk and act around clients. They will ask you to detail each situation in which you had to solve a customer complaint or when you had to exceed expectations. Some of the most common questions are:

Tell me about a time you dealt with an angry/unsatisfied client?

Tell me about a time you solved a conflict at work?

Tell me about a time when you worked very well with your colleagues?

Tell me about a time when you went the extra mile for a client?

So, because you have dealt with this kind of experiences, you’ll have what to share with recruiters. You’ll be able to offer them relevant details and information on the management of the issues.

IMPORTANT: any work experience in customer care is extremely useful. However, hostess/promoter jobs come with a flexible program which will allow you to finish your studies and to have a decent income. It really depends on your current situation which job you will choose.

Therefore, plan your aviation career step by step. Because…

STEP BY STEP YOU’LL GET TO FLY!

 

We prepare you to pass any airline interview:

1. Join our two days course in Madrid, Chișinau or London in which you’ll find everything you have to know about aviation, the interview and the stages of it. We will make sure you go prepared to your Open Day or Assessment Day! Also, we will also make you a perfect cabin crew CV and we will be with you during your entire journey to the skies. Details and registration here.

 

2. If you want to have a broad overview of the role and duties of cabin crew, airline companies profiles, stages of each airlines’ interview and how to pass them, we are waiting for you at our courses. We make your perfect cabin crew CV & pictures, we help you gain confidence and learn how to speak in public, so you will have a flawless performance at your cabin crew interview. Details and registration here.

 

3. If you cannot attend our courses, regardless of where in the world you are located, we can work together privately. Through coaching sessions via web video (Skype or Google Hangouts), our trainers can work with you to improve your performance at the cabin crew interview and supporting you every step of the way to get you where you want to be. More details here

 

How many languages a cabin crew has to speak?

Making a top 3 of the most asked questions about the cabin crew job, the one we’ll be talking about today is about the languages spoken by cabin crew.

This question is a very important one because a good mastering of certain languages is a requirement for any airline company.

The aviation industry promotes the development of a multicultural workplace. This thing is obvious due to aviation’s main goal – bringing people together. It is well known that big airline companies are recruiting cabin crew from all around the world.

Nationals airline companies are looking for flight attendants that can talk fluently in the official language of their country (besides English). Some examples could be: Turkish Airlines (Turkish), KLM (Dutch) or Lufthansa (German).

A basic rule and general selection criteria is to have an English language knowledge above medium level, both written and spoken. That’s why the interviews and all the instructions are given to the candidates in English. Most times companies will also have a written English exam.

Of course, knowing a second or third language is an advantage but no company is making their choice due to this aspect.

Why English language is so important?

The main reason why flight attendants must have a good knowledge of English is that in this way, they’ll be able to effectively communicate in this field. Human errors, communication barriers can be the cause of a tragedy. The entire crew, pilots, air traffic controllers, engineers, all who deal with an aircraft or the services offered on board an aircraft must talk a common language. Imagine how it would be if flight attendants couldn’t understand the command of the other cabin crew. Therefore, mastering English is a safety criteria in aviation.

I hope this helped you in not giving up on your dream if you don’t know any other languages besides English. Our trainer, Roxana, who flown for Gulf Air (read here her story) speaks only English and Romanian (mother tongue), so it’s a real proof that she made it!

 

We prepare you to pass any airline interview:

1. Join our two days course in Madrid in which you’ll find everything you have to know about aviation, the interview and the stages of it. We will make sure you go prepared to your Open Day or Assessment Day! Also, we will also make you a perfect cabin crew CV and we will be with you during your entire journey to the skies. Details and registration here.

 

2. If you want to have a broad overview of the role and duties of cabin crew, airline companies profiles, stages of each airlines’ interview and how to pass them, we are waiting for you at our courses. We make your perfect cabin crew CV & pictures, we help you gain confidence and learn how to speak in public, so you will have a flawless performance at your cabin crew interview. Details and registration here.

 

3. If you cannot attend our courses, regardless of where in the world you are located, we can work together privately. Through coaching sessions via web video (Skype or Google Hangouts), our trainers can work with you to improve your performance at the cabin crew interview and supporting you every step of the way to get you where you want to be. More details here

Why are men wanted in aviation?

The cabin crew job doesn’t mean only beautiful uniforms, impeccable make-up, red lipstick and perfect bun. During the flights, you’ll meet all sort of people, cultures and situations which can pun the flight attendants in difficulty. Because every day is different, cabin crew have to be themselves very different, with various personalities, this including both women and men.

Although media is always talking about “stewardesses”, “air hostesses”, “female flight attendants” and rarely about men building a career in aviation, the number of those practising this job is increasing considerably.

Did you know the first flight attendant in the world was a man?

Henrich Kubis is the first male flight attendant who in 1912 was hired by Delag Airline, on a Zeppelin LZ-10. His duties were similar with those of today’s cabin crew: taking care of passengers and assuring they have a comfortable ride.

Therefore, being a male flight attendant isn’t a tabu subject, something rare and extremely hard to find. Actually, more and more airline companies are looking for male cabin crew to join their team. The most popular ones are Emirates, Qatar Airways, Etihad Airways, Wizz Air, Ryanair, British Airways, Norwegian and the list can continue. The companies which are looking ONLY for females are a few comparing the ones from above.

Why do companies need male cabin crew?

The answer is simple: because we are equals and diversity is beautiful. Duties of a male flight attendant aren’t different from the ones of a female. The only difference is when, in certain cultures, the presence of a man onboard is preferred. For example, some religions prohibit man to have eye contact or any other sort of contact with a woman. That’s why most of the flights to and from Israel are operated almost every time by a crew only with men.

The passion for flying and the wish to have a career in this environment can’t be divided by gender. Man doesn’t have to be pilots and girls flight attendants. Each of them has to follow their passion. So if until now you were undecided whether you can work as a flight attendant or not, now you know all the aspects of this subject. Men can be “stewardesses” too!

We prepare you to pass any airline interview:

  1. If you want to have a broad overview of the role and duties of cabin crew, airline companies profiles, stages of each airlines’ interview and how to pass them, we are waiting for you at our courses. We make your perfect cabin crew CV & pictures, we help you gain confidence and learn how to speak in public, so you will have a flawless performance at your cabin crew interview. Details and registration here.

 

  1. If you cannot attend our courses, regardless of where in the world you are located, we can work together privately. Through coaching sessions via web video (Skype or Google Hangouts), our trainers can work with you to improve your performance at the cabin crew interview and supporting you every step of the way to get you where you want to be. More details here

Cabin crew life in the Middle East. My experience at Gulf Air

One year ago I was writing on my personal blog about beginnings. About the courage to step in an unknown field, about the strength no build a career from zero. About changes, decisions, risks. Looking now at all those things, I realize that I had the same feelings as many others in my place. The distance between the Middle East and Europe is more than just geographical distance, it’s also about embracing a new culture and spirituality.

Of course, this experience can be different from one individual to another. That’s why, I will share my personal, unique story, in which I learned to fully embrace the Arabic culture and to accept people for who they are, not according to their labels.

I arrived in Bahrain at 8 PM after 3 flights. I was tired, facing unknown, the heat and the dry air weren’t helping me at all. I never thought I’ll get used to such a different climate. I was feeling a total stranger. I guess for me, the most important thing that mattered at that moment was that I wasn’t alone at all. At Bahrain airport, we were greeted by someone from the company and permanently guided by this person. We received all the instructions about what’s next, some money and a sim card. Also, a bus took us straight to the accommodation. The next morning, the same bus picked us up in front of the building at 8 am sharp. So we learned from the first day how important is to be punctual.

I believe getting used to be a flight attendant in the Middle East is different from one person to another. For someone with a strong personality, life here can seem too disciplined. For a free, libertine personality can seem too rigorous. Luckily, I didn’t think those rules were too harsh, I looked within them and found their true meaning. One of the most challenging times for a European is during Ramadan. Ramadan is a strict fast which lasts 1 month. You aren’t allowed to eat in public spaces. The best is to only eat at home at that time of the year. One aspect that I truly respected was the way I was dressing. In Bahrain isn’t mandatory to wear abaya (long black dress) or to have your face covered. You can dress however you want. Still, I considered myself as a guest in their country so I adopted a more formal, elegant dress code when going in public spaces. So instead of wearing a top, I’d wear a T-shirt and because it’s hot all year I wore long skirts which were really comfortable.

If you don’t want to change your style, it isn’t a big problem, but you’ll have to get used to some prying eyes.

I believe training is the start of your aviation career. The training for Gulf Air takes up to 2 months with an 8 hours program, Sundays ’till Thursdays (Fridays and Saturdays are free days). The curriculum is indeed a lot to handle, but luckily it is spared into weeks of study with both theoretical and practical lessons. You’ll learn about medical problems, cabin service, safety and emergency procedures, security, ditching, grooming, crew resource manager, firefight and many more. You’ll have lots of situations in which you can apply your knowledge in practical exercises, so you can be prepared in any of the emergencies.

Even though at first it seemed impossible, the feeling I had when I received my diploma was totally worth it!

On my first day, I understood why the recruitment process was that long. Gulf Air Training Centre was waiting for us with everything prepared. Each classroom, each simulator, the building in which we’ll stay during those 2 months, the manuals, the free transport and many more. This shows that it took lots of preparations and they are really professional.

Our batch was formed by 13 people, 7 of them were Romanians, thing that for me mattered very much. During classes and training, we were talking all the time in English, but in our free time we were talking in Romanian and this is a real help. So if you have in your batch people with the same nationality as yours, make sure you’ll become friends! It really matters with the homesickness feeling. A good thing in Bahrain is that it is a safe city. You can go and have fun with your friends without any problems.

I believe the trainers felt the connection between us, therefore the courses went smoothly. For each course, we had another trainer. They all were well prepared and serious but at the same time very friendly and understanding. At the end of each course (which can last 2 days, up to 2 weeks), we had an exam. In order to pass to the next course, you had to pass it.

I can’t guarantee that each of you will feel the same as I did in an Arabic country, but I advise you to believe in your feelings and if something is not ok, listen to that. Make a change!

“Life can be lived anywhere. The environment is not important, what is really essential is the intensity of it.” – Cezar Petrescu (Romanian author)

 

Warm regards,

Roxi

 

*story written by our trainer, Roxana, from her own experience as a Gulf Air cabin crew. 
*story translated into English by our editor, Georgiana.

Join our courses! We prepare you to pass any airline interview:

  1. If you want to have a broad overview of the role and duties of cabin crew, airline companies profiles, stages of each airlines’s interview and how to pass them, we are waiting for you at our 4 days intensive course. We make your perfect cabin crew CV & pictures, we help you gain confidence and learn how to speak in public, so you will have a flawless performance at your cabin crew interview. Details and registration here.

 

  1. If you cannot attend our courses, regardless of where in the world you are located, we can work together privately. Through coaching sessions via web video (Skype or Google Hangouts), our trainers can work with you to improve your performance at the cabin crew interview and supporting you every step of the way to get you where you want to be. More details here

This Christmas, we’re sharing good thoughts to all corners of the world!

What does a Cabin Crew feel when flying? Freedom, happiness, friendship, gratitude? Once you have stepped on board in an impeccable uniform means you have fallen in love. The best part is that aviation will never leave you and will always by your side.

Now comes a harder question. What does a Cabin Crew feel when flying on Christmas day? A huge emptiness in the soul caused by the absence of family and friends. No matter how amazing the big cities are, home is the place where your thoughts fly most often, especially when December is coming, you appreciate more and more what you had back home.

In Dubai, Doha, London or Paris, children do not go from door to door to sing carols. You hear Christmas songs only on shopping malls in other languages that you mother tongue. Your grandma is not baking sweets, your father is not preparing mouth-watering meat and the mulled wine doesn’t have the same taste. Actually, all of these are happening, but really far far away. Of course, among Cabin Crew are those lucky flight attendants who have free days during Christmas Holidays and get to feel these in person. Even though we’re far, we respect our countries’ traditions with joy in our soul.

Christmas onboard is amazing! Passengers become your second home. They need all your warmth and you, as a Cabin Crew, have to offer everything in the right way. Often onboard you’ll hear Christmas Carols, you’ll dring hot cinnamon tea and the most inventive ones bring with them Santa hats, gingerbread and chocolate.

Let’s just look at the bright side: onboard you can celebrate New Year’s Day each time you are above a country in which the time zone shows 00:00. The longer the destination is, the more wishes you can make, be closer to fireworks and also offer passengers lots of champagne glasses.

On one hand, as cabin crew you make lots of sacrifices, but on the other hand, you gain new experiences which you’ll remember years after years and will make you feel proud. You build lots of friendships, you share common ideas, you laugh at the same jokes with your colleagues,  these are small things that make a flight attendant’s life rich. The most important thing learnt as a cabin crew is that time is not measured in hours, but memories. When you come back home after your aviation career ended, you realize distance hasn’t changed your relationships from home. Grandma’s still baking sweets, you still decorate the Christmas tree along with your family.

Give the others what you have in your soul is one of the virtues that make people superheroes. Aviation is the place where you feel these things. You cand easily call it “home” and keep it in your soul for the rest of your life. When you’ll want to rewind time, you’ll have your memories right there, waiting for you.

Place your wish under the tree and if it’s strong enough, it will catch wings sooner than you think.

How to be Cabin Crew team wishes you Happy Holidays wherever you are! Fully enjoy every moment because each individual’s happiness only depends on themselves!

*All the pictures in this article are of our students’ who now follow their dreams in the clouds.

Why to choose a How to be Cabin Crew course?

Why choose us?

  • Our trainers have significant experience in aviation, working both as cabin crew and recruiters for major airline companies.
  • We teach you, step by step, how to be successful at the interview
  • Our How to be Cabin Crew employment success rate is approximately 80% – this means that 80% out of our students are passing the interview with an airline company and are working as Cabin Crew.
  • You are receiving real and objective feedback regarding you success rate of employment. Our trainers will tell you what to do, and mostly, what NOT to, in order to know exactly what you need to improve
  • Our courses are covering information about the interview tasks, how an cabin crew interview goes, what happens after the interview and also about the life of a Flight Attendant in the Middle East and in Europe
  • We offer after course guidance and support. Throughout the course-interview-employment period we are here for you, we offer you advice and help you succeed. We are keeping a very strong connection with our students, and sometimes, even with their parents.
  • We publish everyday articles about the aviation life, interviews with successful flight attendants, stories from “the clouds” and we answer to all your questions.
  • Till present time, we prepared over 2500 students and organized more than 140 courses in Europe
  • We are always smiling and we receive our students with an open heart. We are striving constantly to be better every day and that’s what makes a difference.

We prepare you to pass any airline interview:

If you want to have a broad overview of the role and duties of cabin crew, airline companies profiles, stages of each airlines’s interview and how to pass them, we are waiting for you at our 4 days intensive course. We make your perfect cabin crew CV & pictures, we help you gain confidence and learn how to speak in public, so you will have a flawless performance at your cabin crew interview. Details and registration here.

Choose to fly!

Life is about the choices we make, because opportunities will always be plenty, or we can create them, but it is our choice to make the change or not, to experiment or not, to fly or not.

I met so many people who told me they are scared of flying (or that’s what they think, because most of them never flew before) or that they have fear of heights. I can tell them that most of my colleagues have these fears, and it didn’t prevent them of working as Cabin Crew. To some, money determined them to overcome their fear, others only wish to travel the world, to see more and more, and what better way to do that then when you are young and financially limited?

Before this experience, I couldn’t imagine that I will manage to see all the places I only saw on TV, to live a little bit in the most unique corners of the world, that I would be able to live in a country with a different climate, another culture, another religion, and even more, I didn’t know I would accommodate. But one of our qualities as humans is that we adapt easily. I left home for United Arab Emirates to work as a Flight Attendant and in my mind I said I will only work for 2 years. 2 years that became 5. And they were the most fulfilling 5 years of my life where I experimented so many things and places that most of us don’t have the chance to see.

I can’t say that it is easy to live so far from home, to move to another country, with many unknown things (back then in 2008), but I can tell you that you will live wonderful experiences, you will meet people from all over the world, make new friends and gather so many memories, because this is about in life. Sometime I could only dream about these things, now I remember them with a big smile on my face. Die with memories, not dreams!

Before becoming a Flight Attendant, I flew 2 times on airplane, once with Carpatair and another time with Blue Air, and I wanted to do this more often, as a child that experiments something and wants to do it over and over again.

But, in contrast with a child, that gets bored easily by repeating the same game, I can say that I felt the same emotions each time the airplane took-off. And it’s not only about take-off, it’s the flight among the clouds. In my 5 years as Cabin Crew, I had the opportunity to admire so many “paintings” out there that nature offers us every day.

And we have the landing. The landing emotion can’t be compared with anything because you have so many mixed emotions: the emotion of touching the land again, emotion of a new successful landing, the emotion of arriving in a place that you wanted to visit or just arriving home after a long day. Everything in aviation is about emotions and memories.

That’s why it is said that this job gets in your veins, because, even if at some point everything you do it’s a routine, the job of Cabin Crew is a routine full of emotions and adventures, it is a lifestyle.

We prepare you to pass any airline interview:

If you want to have a broad overview of the role and duties of cabin crew, airline companies profiles, stages of each airlines’s interview and how to pass them, we are waiting for you at our 4 days intensive course. We make your perfect cabin crew CV & pictures, we help you gain confidence and learn how to speak in public, so you will have a flawless performance at your cabin crew interview. Details and registration here.

How to write a Cabin Crew (Flight Attendant) CV

Whether you’re attending an airline’s open day or applying for cabin crew roles online, preparing a professional CV is one of the most important parts of the application process. In this article, we go over what recruiters in the aviation want to see on your CV and provide you with step-by-step advice on how you can prepare your cabin crew CV to ensure it is optimised for the aviation industry.

As air traffic is increasing year-on-year, the aviation industry is growing at an unprecedented pace. And flight attendant roles are among the most sought after in the industry. This is a trend this is not likely to change any time soon. By 2037, Europe is expected to require an additional 187,000 cabin crew members, while the Asia Pacific region is expected to require an additional 321,000 cabin crew members*.

Despite this growth, competition for cabin crew roles is strong. Major airlines receive thousands of applications for cabin crew roles per month. As such, having a professional CV that is written in line with the expectations of the aviation industry is crucial.

Although experience is always beneficial when applying for cabin crew roles, many airlines employ entry-level individuals. So whether you’re new to the aviation industry or a seasoned cabin crew professional, use our tips to ensure your CV is having a positive impact in your applications.

How to structure your cabin crew CV?

Include a photo – Unlike most other positions, it is necessary to include a photo on cabin crew CVs. The type of photo you include in your cabin crew CV could be make or break your application. Don’t include holiday photos or photos of yourself from a distance. The photo should be a professional head and shoulders shot of you wearing business attire, about the size of a passport photo.

Remember what the airline is looking for – someone who is professional, articulate and well-presented. Bring this out in your photo – which may be the first impression the airline gets of you – and you have taken a big step towards securing your role in the aviation industry.

Position your photo in the top left/right corner of your CV.

Include your Statistics – Some airlines require members of the cabin crew to be a certain height, so make sure to include these details, ideally in a concise section that stands out on your CV. Go further by adding other specific details that are relevant to the job application, such as any extra languages that you speak and swimming ability.

Placing this information in an easy-to-find section of your CV will ensure the reader can instantly locate it. Most recruiters spend only a matter of seconds reviewing CVs, so you don’t want them having to spend half a minute scanning through your document. If you’re applying to an airline that does not have height requirements, don’t include these details.

Include a Professional Profile – Often called a personal statement, a professional profile is a concise introduction at the top of your CV, usually around 75-125 words in length. This is your chance to tell the recruiter about yourself as a professional and what you can offer as a member of the cabin crew. Avoid being vague and ensure your professional profile is specific to the aviation industry. This is often a good place to talk about the airlines you have worked with and the routes you have worked on as a flight attendant.

Include your Work Experience – Add a work experience section (if you’re new to the aviation industry, start with the education/qualifications section). Structure your work experience in reverse chronological order, starting with your most recent role and working backwards. Use bullet points for ease of reading and ensure to use active verbs and dynamic language.

Focus on your key, relevant responsibilities and achievements rather than detailing a list of everything you did, which could end up reading more like a job description. For example, draw attention to the flight safety instructions you delivered, your regular engagement with passengers and your compliance with safety standards.

If you don’t have experience in cabin crew roles, identify your transferable experiences and skills and focus on those. Have you got experience in customer-facing environments? Have you got experience handling cash or serving food? These skills are all transferable to cabin crew roles, so ensure you utilise them to full effect.

Include your Education and Qualifications – Include any qualifications you have achieved, starting with your most recent, alongside the dates attended and the college/university names. Specify any certifications or licences you possess that are required for the job.

Remember to detail any training you have undertaken that is relevant to cabin crew roles; these might include airline-specific training, first aid, food handling, emergency procedures, customer service and safety.

It’s always a good idea to embark on new training courses and acquire new skills to enhance your capabilities while searching for jobs in the aviation industry. For example, a two-day first aid course could add a great deal of value to your CV; when you weigh up the cost and time involved with undertaking professional development, you might find it could pay off in the long-term.

Additional Tip – If you’re preparing a CV for a cabin crew position in a non-English-speaking country, note that your CV should still be written in English, as English is the international language of the aviation industry.

What Skills are required for Cabin Crew Jobs?

Customer Service – The role of a flight attendant is fundamentally about providing a positive, pleasant experience for customers while ensuring their safety. Excellent customer service skills play a big role in delivering these positive experiences.

However, simply stating that you have great customer service skills isn’t going to add any real value to your CV. You can be sure that almost everyone who applies for cabin crew jobs is going to claim to have great customer service skills, but less will actually demonstrate these skills.

Detail your specific experiences interacting with customers. Draw attention to your time in customer-facing roles and highlight your achievements while dealing with customers. Maybe you once went the extra mile for a customer who was dissatisfied or turned a dissatisfied customer into a repeat customer? These are tangible achievements that show your customer service qualities, and they add a great deal of value to your CV.

Whether or not you have experience in cabin crew roles, it’s important that you highlight your experience engaging with customers (or people in general if you don’t have customer experience).

Communication – A key part of your job as a member of the cabin crew will involve communication, both with customers and colleagues. You will be required to communicate safety/emergency procedures to passengers in a clear manner and liaise with your colleagues to ensure the efficiency of cabin tasks.

 An effective way of demonstrating your communication skills is to draw attention to both your work and non-work activities. Have you taken part in public speaking events? Have you delivered presentations or led meetings in your previous positions? Outlining these kinds of experiences is a great way of letting recruiters gain an understanding of your communication skills.

Professionalism – As the face of the airline, you will play a key role in determining what customers think of the airline. This is why recruiters look for cabin crew members who can demonstrate a strong degree of professionalism on a consistent basis. You need to be able to maintain your professionalism in challenging situations or when dealing with problematic passengers. Highlighting specific experiences where you demonstrated your professionalism in such situations will have a positive impact on your CV.

Teamwork – Cabin crew operations run smoothly when team are cohesive and working collaboratively. Very often, you will be working with new people who you have never met. As such, you need to able to quickly adapt to working in new teams and bond with people from various backgrounds. Working effectively as a team might extend to taking over your colleagues tasks while they assist an elderly passenger or asking them to assume your responsibilities in order to achieve positive outcomes.

To draw attention to your team working skills, you might want to describe your experiences outside of employment. This could range from captaining your local rugby team to success or collaborating with fellow students during a group project at university.

Appearance – Although not directly a skill, maintaining your appearance is an important aspect of being flight attendant. Airlines have grooming standards and some will go as far as to specify how you should style your hair. You will need the organisation skills to ensure your uniform is always immaculate and your dress code is in line with the airlines standards.

A great way to demonstrate your polished appearance is through your CV photo. Additionally, your interview or any other engagements with airline recruiters is always an ideal opportunity to show off your elegance and your crease-less attire.

Adaptability – As a flight attendant, you’re likely to get about 156 days off per year, a significant number in comparison to the average office worker who gets around 96 days off per year. Despite this, you will need to be adaptable with regards to your plans at home. Flight delays are not uncommon, and you should be prepared to make changes to your plans at short notice.

Not only should you exhibit adaptability with your plans back home, but also with your activities during the course of flights. Altering your priorities as flights progress in order to adapt to new situations is an important part of the role.

Demonstrate your penchant for adaptability in your CV by specifying times when you acquired new skills to perform new tasks, took on new responsibilities or developed alternative solutions to problems.

Source: CV-nation.com

* According to Statista, the demand for new cabin crew members in the aviation industry is expected to be 187,000 for Europe and 321,000 for the Asia Pacific region (2017).

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This course is designed to help you to prepare for cabin crew interviews with ANY international airline.