Punctuality. The key in aviation

“Time is money” is a slogan that adapts to any situation from everyday life, but when it comes to aviation any extra minutes that keep a plane on ground forces the company to take money out of their pocket. The same thing we can say about the cabin crew job: regardless of the employer company, there is a timetable that you have to follow with Holiness, and when it comes to punctuality, I can honestly say that means 90% of your business card. The story makes me to have already gone through this experience, and in the following I will tell you briefly my experience which has become a timeless:

It was my first month flying for Emirates and I had just landed in Dubai after a very long flight from the Philippines when I decided to check out the roster again. I had done this check somewhere at around 11.40 P.M, and the mistake that cost me afterwards was that I did not give importance to the date in which we found ourselves at the time. My roster was showing as follows: May 24 FREE, May 25 flight to Kuwait at 01.15 AM. After my interpretation I had two days off and the third day night departure to Kuwait. Checking date: May 23, flight date May 25. So from my calculations resulted that I get home, I have all the next day to enjoy Dubai, and the day after, in the night, go for Kuwait flight. The theory of an unexperienced and tired flight attendant. In reality, I had only one day off as after midnight I was already on May 24, and flight time being on May 25 at 1.15 A.M which meant that my preparation should start on my day off around 9 P.M. The fact that I did not checked the flight schedule carefully and I did not taken into account that it’s already 00.00 wich meant the beginning of another day, led me to failure for that flight.
I spent my first day off at the pool, in the evening I went out for a walk, and after that I went home where I felt asleep peacefully with the thought that it’s so good to have days off when you can really explore life in Dubai. But the next day early in the morning, shock and horror in my roster: “ABSENT” was written with big block red letters for the Kuwait flight. Initially I thought my phone or application was affected by the heat or the application got stuck, but after I called the number of the Crew Support, I was shocked to find out that I really missed the flight, and this incident will be documented in my file for the next six months. The first instinct was to cry because I was very nervous and it was not my intention to miss the flight, but after a few minutes I realized that I should calm down and explain to my manager what happened in fact and what was my reason for not showing up. Following this incident, which by the way I could have cost me being promoted I began to check my application twice on the phone, ask another opinion if I was too tired to figure it out, or even to use the Crew Portal which was conceived to avoid such situations.

One thing is certain: the cabin crew job makes you forget most of the times on what day of the week you find yourselves, what date and what time is at home, and that’s just because your home is up in the sky!

Join us on an exclusive 4 days cabin crew interview preparation course. We’ll share everything you need to know to pass the cabin crew interview stages, we will edit your perfect CV and take professional pictures for your online application. At the end of the course, you will be fully prepared for an interview with any airline company. Book your seat now! 

Adina-Golden Mail

Her green-blue eyes are the first thing that makes you watch her closely. Warm smile, soft look and she knows how to make herself liked from the first interaction. She is Adina, our student who shortly will start working as Cabin Crew for Primera Air.

She came to know us last year in October at our meeting with How to be Cabin Crew readers, and after that event she hadn’t stopped working till she made her dream come true. She followed 2 courses with our team and in a few months her dream was real: she received the long waiting GOLDEN EMAIL.

For her age, Adina is an example of ambition and desire to overcome her limits. She has 21 years and customer service experience as far to another 5 years, this bringing her the winning ticket before Primera Air recruiters who saw in her the right candidate for the Cabin Crew position at their Scandinavian company.

  1. When did you thought you could pursue a career as a flight attendant and what was hidden behind such a decision?

When I started thinking about a career as Cabin Crew I was a teenager, somewhere in high school, in a small town from the beautiful area of Toscana, Italy. There I lived approximately 7 years, there I formed myself, and I finished high school.  I came back to Bucharest to continue my studies at Foreign Languages Faculty. I already abandoned the idea of working among the clouds till the second year of faculty when a good friend of mine and colleague told me that her dream after she finishes her studies is to become a Flight Attendant. That was the moment when I dreamed again about traveling the world and to accompany world travelers to their dream destinations.

  1. What is your present job? Do you think your experience helped you in any way at the interview?

At the moment I don’t have a job, but I started working from 16 years old because I always liked being around people and being useful. I started as a Customer Services for an Italian company, and then I worked as a Waitress and Bartender in a restaurant-bar. In the end, here in Bucharest I had the opportunity to work as a Receptionist at a hotel. I think these jobs helped me so much to form myself as a person and in the same time were a plus at the interview, as well as my knowledge of foreign languages.

  1. How did you prepare for the interview with airline companies? How many interviews did you attend before succeeding?

When I am interested in something I start a little research. The internet was my big source of information, I read all sorts of articles, I entered on many forums, I consulted different websites, among which was your website, “How to be Cabin Crew”. I started taking notes, details about each company and also started to study a little bit the aviation vocabulary. I decided to follow your courses, experience which brought me a lot of courage, and more ambition to make my dreams come true. Excellent trainers and a very relaxing atmosphere at your venue made all the information necessary for the interview and about this job to be assimilated very easily and with a pleasure rarely encountered.

  1. How did you manage to stay positive in the moment when you were eliminated from an interview?

It is true I participated to multiple interviews for different airline companies. In most cases I didn’t managed to pass the CV Drop, which disappointed me a little. I didn’t understand what was wrong, what was missing, why (even if everyone saw in me the stewardess girl in the movies) I didn’t succeeded to pass the final interview. After a few attempts, I stopped asking myself questions, I was more relaxed, I tried not to show the recruiters the perfection in me and I went to the interview more relaxed, exactly as I am. I imagined meeting the recruiters like I was meeting my best friends at a coffee shop where we talk and make plans for the future. I think I succeeded to bring that good feeling and optimism and that was what led to my success. I encourage everyone to not give up after a few attempts. I am sure that each one of us has a place in the clouds that is waiting to be filled.

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  1. What do you think it is the biggest challenge for a flight attendant?

The biggest challenge for Cabin Crew? Well…I think here the answer is more individual. For some missing home and the loved ones is the biggest challenge, for others the fact that they can not communicate in their mother tongue at their work place, having a different lifestyle, to confront with different and difficult situation and persons along the flight.

  1. Tell me what are the most 3 important qualities that a future candidate should possess at an interview?

After I participated to so many and diverse interviews I made myself aware that it wasn’t my fault. I started to think that at the interview day it must be “love at first sight” between the recruiter and candidate. This idea helped me stay in track when I was eliminated from another interview and to attend more interviews ready to win the recruiters. It is very well known that the preparation before the interview is fundamental. Information is the key. Confidence in yourself and perseverance are, as well, an important factor. And smile, lots of natural big smile, that bring with it warmth, love, optimism.

  1. Do you want to transmit a message for How to be Cabin Crew team?

The founders of this project succeeded to introduce me from the first moments in the amazing story of Cabin Crew Life, in what means life in the clouds. Good luck to future readers and candidates and to motivate them I remained that “The sky is not the limit, it’s just the beginning!”

Prepare yourself for the upcoming interviews with the big airline companies. Come at our How to be Cabin Crew courses and make a step forward towards your dream. Details and registration here.

After 5 years as Cabin Crew: nothing is hard if you have your wings

Lili worked for 5 years as Cabin Crew for Etihad Airways. She left the company when she was pregnant with her first child, but she has flying deep in her blood. For her “nothing is hard for those who got their wings”. Lili is brave, she followed her dream and started working for Etihad Airways in 2008, when there weren’t so many information about this company in the Middle East.

I was so excited to hear her story as it radiates passion and dedication. Nevertheless, Lili is a beautiful soul, a former amazing cabin crew.

How did you start flying? Tell us about your first encounter with aviation

Dear Anca, through this interview I hope to inspire young people to fly, to chase their dreams and do things with passion. I got to fly because that was my faith. I didn’t choose this job, this job chose me. I never thought that one day I will do this or that I will arrive that far, I think I didn’t allow myself dreaming so far. But then I got my wings and I learned to fly. I simply applied to all the jobs I thought were interesting, even for those abroad and one day I woke up with a phone call from a recruiting agency who offered me the possibility to attend an interview with an airline company from UAE. (I hadn’t even heard of this country.) Normally, I would have ignored such an invitation, because I was called to go in another city to attend the interview. I was 27 years old and I wanted to leave the country, to see how the world is. I succeeded the second time, therefore in august 2008 I arrived in Abu Dhabi. It was a whole different world, at first it was hard to accommodate with such high temperatures, but I had the luck to know someone from my hometown who made the accomodation easier. We are still very good friends till this day, and she is my connection with UAE and with the job among the clouds. I had 2 months of intensive training. We had courses till the afternoon, we arrived home at midnight and the next day we woke up in the morning to study and at 11 am we were going again back to the academy. It seemed liked my dreem job fit me like a glove. And it was exactly like that. I graduated with high grades at Safety and it was my strong point along my career

You worked 5 years for Etihad Airways. How was your first flight? Where did you fly?

The first flight was extremely difficult, I was supposed to be an Observer during the flight, but I had to work exactly the same as the others in order to satisfy all the passengers requests, it was a very interesting experience for me. The flight was full, on a small airplane (A320). I must say that even before knowing about this job, I was passionate about the shows on National Geographic related to airplanes (Aircraft Investigations, Disasters in air). There may be a destiny, right?

How was a day for an Etihad Airways flight attendant?

A flying day was a real ritual, because it meant the same make-up, the same hair style, same uniform and a Briefing before each flight. After this, you will walk proudly with the whole crew under the starring eyes of the passengers. The flights were mostly tiring, but everything was fine as long as the crew knew how to communicate and work in a team.  If this didn’t happen, the flight would be a failure, but each flight is a lesson. This job/world taught me to be grateful (for the fact that I was born in Romania and I had the chance to have an education, for the fact that I knew 4 seasons, and so on.), I learned to be the best, to be patient, to respect different cultures, to accept that we are all what we are.

Tell us a funny story of one of your flights.

Hmm, there were so many. I remember on the second flight as an Observer when my colleagues along with the Captain tried to prank me. Ah, a whole flight laughed when the copilot forgot to deactivate “PA” (public announcement) and all the passengers heard their private conversation after landing.

Have you ever encountered an emergency situation? How did you react?

Fortunate, I haven’t had serious incidents in my 5 years as Cabin Crew. I once had a gentleman who fell in a deep sleep and his wife thought he died. In this kind of situations most important it is to remain calm, to talk with your passengers and to ask the help of your colleagues. In general, I am a strong person, I don’t panic and I manage to deal calmly with this kind of situations and to be useful when needed.

Which was one of the great satisfactions that this job offered you?

Seeing happy people: that hand shake when they left the airplane, that “thank you” in their language, the joy of offering a smile. And not least, the joy of seeing and living for a short period of time in all those places I had the privilege to arrive to.

What will be the disadvantages of this job?

Oh, the minuses…yes, they are plenty. Seen from outside, it is a wonderful job, and nobody knows what it truly means. It involves a lot of physical work, not only mentally, it is about working long hours, taking care of people, washing toilets if necessary, cleaning vomit and the list goes on. The idea is that from the moment you arrived in the airplane till landing, the airplane is your home, and from the moment the doors are closed till opening you are there for anything that the passengers need and trust me a lot can happen: babies can be born, people could die, accidents can happen, and so on.

Do you miss flying? How is your life now? What plans you have in the future?

Yes, I miss it, even if I don’t have time to think about it and my baby girl is offering me all the joy and satisfaction I need. I was still working for Etihad Airways when I got pregnant (I had a long distance relationship with my husband, he was in Romania, and Lia happened on one of our escapades in Istanbul). I flew for 2 more months with her in my belly and my last flight was the longest one. What can I say? It was an amazing experience, I will always say that, I am glad I had this opportunity. If I had another age when I left,  I would have arrived far… I left from a FJ position (First and Business Class Attendant), and I was about to become Cabin Senior, but I didn’t had the opportunity. I have a tattoo “Alis Grave nil” (Nothing is hard for those who have their wings)

Best regards,

Lili.

Prepare yourself for the upcoming interviews with the big airline companies. Attend one of our How to be Cabin Crew courses and make a step  towards your dream. Details and registration here.

Interview with former Qatar Cabin Crew, Zaheer Alvi

When did you first know that you want to be a cabin crew?

Since I was born, I was interested in aviation. My mother told me that whenever I use to see an aircraft, I use to call it ‘My Plane’. However, during my high-school, I always wanted to do something to get into the aircraft business and honestly, to see the world. I think the best idea was either as a pilot or being a cabin crew . When I started looking up aviation jobs, some of my friends and family discouraged me into becoming a pilot. They thought so many people have this job and they can not find a job for themselves. So, I started thinking about other ways of travelling around the world and that was the time I thought of becoming cabin crew.

 

How would you describe yourself before getting into aviation?

It might shock you that I was a very shy person before getting into the airline business. I didn’t talked to strangers and it was very difficult for me to trust other persons. I was mostly quiet and mostly misunderstood due to my quiet behavior in new places. I was so quiet that when I joined the airline business, many people use to think that I don’t like to work with them due to my behavior. But in time I managed to overcome my emotions, and to be more openly and friendly.

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For how many airlines did you work and for how long?

I have worked only for Qatar Airways for 14 years, because I was born in Doha and I never wanted to leave the place.

 

Which was the highest position that you had in the airline?

I had reached the position of CSD and the reason I never applied for a higher one (for an office job) was because I didn’t wanted to quit flying.

 

Did your private life have to suffer because of traveling so much?

Not really. The reason is that when you enjoy doing something, it will not affect your life or in other word you don’t have to suffer due to the things you are enjoying. No matter what kind of job you have, there are always cons and pros to it. We should remember that a good life is not about WHAT you are doing, it is always about HOW you are doing it. No matter which profession you are working in, if you are not satisfied or you do not enjoy doing it, you are going to suffer not only professionally, but also personally. As I was enjoying flying and always having new people around me, my private life was never affected by my work.

 

Were you sad when you had to stop flying?

Yes, it was a big change. For me, I think flying gets in your blood; once you get used to it, you have to really prepare yourself psychologically to quit.

 

Do you still keep in touch with your friends that you made around the world?

Always! The best thing that happened to me while flying was meeting new people around the world, working with them, travelling with them, getting to know about their cultures, religions etc. It gives you the feeling that you can just meet anyone and you know what they are expecting from you.

 

What are you doing at the moment?

After quitting I finished my studies and right now I have my own business.

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Can you describe in details a happy/unhappy situation that took place in your flight?

As I spend 11 years of flying in supervisor position, most of the times I have tried my best to make every flight a ‘Happy flight’ and I hope I succeeded. I think the most uncomfortable situations for me where when I had to report someone for not being up to the standards of the company. Luckily for me, I never experienced a fight with passengers or had to intervene in disagreement between cabin crew and passengers. The reason is that our crew was trained to follow the standards of the company strictly, and they always tried to make the flight as pleasant as possible.

Prepare yourself for the upcoming interviews with the big airline companies. Come at our How to be Cabin Crew courses and make a step forward towards your dream. Details and registration here.

Three major airlines, one single flight attendant: Antonia’s story

Antonia Talianu is one of the flight attendants who amazed us with their life stories. Now 32, she is a graduate of the Faculty of Journalism and Mass Communication, at University of Bucharest. Seven years have passed since Antonia went to Middle East to make a dream come true. Although it sounds like a cliché, she always wished to fly. At the early age of 15, she got a job that could allow her to travel, doing it whenever possible. Antonia told us how life as a flight attendant gave her freedom in many ways, from the way of thinking to the financial leeway. In a few months, she will become a mother, accomplishing her dream of having her own family too.

Oman Air, Etihad Airways, and Emirates Airline – an impressive chain of Gulf carriers for which you have worked. How did you find out about the interviews and how were they conducted?

To be sincere, at that time, you could gain access to more information only after getting hired by a Gulf airline. Unlike now, when there are so many forums, Facebook pages, or even personal development and professional counseling programs. I have found out about Oman Air from a job offers website. After applying, I was invited to a hotel, together with other 500 girls. It was the first time Oman Air was coming to Romania. The interview process took three days, and with each day passing, we were fewer and fewer. Eventually, 20 girls were chosen, but it was only me and a girl from Piteşti who had the courage to embark to Oman.

For Etihad Airways I’ve applied while I was already flying for Oman Air. I wanted a change, to really see the world, as Etihad Airways had many more destinations. The interview was quite difficult. I flew 45 minutes from Oman to Abu Dhabi. When I arrived at the Etihad head office, I noticed there were not more than 1000 girls who had come for the Assessment Day from all over the world. We started talking and I had around me there girls coming from America, Australia and even Venezuela. Some of them looked like real supermodels. The interview wasn’t different from that of Oman Air. It was a tough selection, lasting one day. We had no time to waste, but only to stay focused. At six o’clock that evening, we were 20 girls and boys waiting for the face-to-face interview. After that, I returned to Muscat, back to my work. In two weeks, I received my visa through an email, together with my air ticket.

Emirates, I have to admit, was my last attempt to live in the Middle East. As a First and Business Class Lounge Supervisor, I wasn’t flying anymore. They contacted me after finding my profile on a website, so that it wasn’t necessary for me to apply. At first I thought it was a joke made by my friends from Abu Dhabi, Etihad Airways being the only airline offering low-fare tickets not only for family, but also for friends. What followed was a Skype interview. After two days, they invited me to a face-to-face interview, sending me an air ticket, the visa and the hotel reservation. Out of the ten Romanian women coming in Dubai for the interview, I was the only one successful. After two weeks, I moved into a studio and started the training.

How long did you work for each airline and how were you promoted?

Oman Air is the airline of my soul. It was there where I have learned everything about culture, religion, mentality and behaviour. I have lived there for three and a half years. But I can honestly say it was thanks to Etihad that I become more mature. They are stricter, but also more respectful. I have been working there for one year and a half. Lastly, Emirates seemed incredibly relaxing to me; I was a different person then, more mature and with some experience behind. Besides, I used to work four days and have the next four days for rest.

At that time, Oman Air didn’t have its own system of promotion. After three tiring months of turnaround flights on a Boeing 737, I have shifted to Airbus 330, which meant flights to Europe and layovers, finally. It was the period when Oman Air was purchasing bigger airplanes, starting its flights to Europe.

Etihad Airways is an airline that cares for your personal development. So after six months, I applied and received the Cabin Senior role, being in charge of the whole Economy Class. My wide experience with Oman surely had a say on it.

In case of Emirates, it is not easy to get promoted, being a ground employee, even already a supervisor. In order to reach the next level, you must speak Arabic. Although I speak, write and read in five different languages, it did not make any difference.

For which one of the airlines did you most enjoy working and why?

I have most enjoyed working for Oman Air, as I had the chance to acquire everything step-by-step. The Omani people are extraordinarily friendly. That is why I have stayed there for three and a half years, starting from the Economy Class and after three months progressing to the premium classes. Wage differences weren’t too big between classes, but this was my opportunity to deal and interact with high society and royalty.

What was your favourite destination and why?

My favourite destination will always be London. I like to call this city “the country with all countries”. In my opinion, like any other big city, London makes it possible for you to experience different cultures, nationalities and various foods. I have long been fascinated by London. From Etihad I received the chance to visit it very often, through the monthly flight schedule which is built on your level of speaking a certain language.

What were your day off activities while living in Muscat, Abu Dhabi and Dubai?

In Muscat you don’t have many possibilities, except clubbing and exploring Oman. I have been hiking, visited oases, slept in a Bedouin tent in the peaceful desert and also found a family, with whom I still keep in touch, even now, after seven years. As for Abu Dhabi, there is a beach and entertainment everywhere; moreover, your cabin crew ID card lets you join all of the clubs and exclusive parties in town. About Dubai, I could say it was made for partying; but, as I had already experienced it, I preferred instead going to the beach or escaping everywhere around the globe for four days.

How would you describe your flight attendant experience at Oman Air?

My experience at Oman Air gave me the confidence I needed to get through all the interviews. I have always felt confident in my knowledge gained there, as well as in my life experience. My advice to both my friends and others who just look at my photos will always be to leave for the Middle East. What you learn there compares to nothing. Some of my happiest moments were those when I was taking by the hand a passenger afraid of flying, saved a life on board, and made someone smile through a small gesture. I could also improvise a vegan menu for someone who couldn’t have meal. I consider it the only possible way to resist tiredness and time zone changes.

Why did you give up flying?

There comes a time in life when you realize you want something else. Personally, I gave up flying because I was dreaming to have my own family and I didn’t want to lose any time. I have seen the world and spent all of my holidays in America, exploring each state one by one. My passport is out of blank pages for visa stamps. I had the opportunity to live an extraordinary life, filled with experiences and lots of things to learn.

How did you feel during your last flight?

This question makes me smile. My first and last flight had been both to Beirut. My colleagues used to nickname me “Dubai – Beirut”, which represented Oman Air’s longest flight; I was flying there at least four or five times a month. So I ended my flight attendant career with a last flight from Abu Dhabi to Beirut. They called me while I was at my base, in home standby, packing to come back home to Romania. I was on call until the very last moment.

How’s life in London, now that you are done with aviation?

Life is what you make it. In London, you have freedom and opportunities to do whatever you want. I don’t work in the aviation field anymore, but as an assistant building manager in an office building, I still get to meet pleasant people of many nationalities. The difference is not so significant, except now I am always on the ground, working from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and having my weekend free.

You can prepare for the upcoming interviews by attending our two day intensive training in Rome. Find more information about the course here. 

Our student was recruited by three airline companies. Now she is cabin crew

It was in November 2014 when our student D. took off to Abu Dhabi. D. is one of the luckiest girls who successfully passed the interview with an important Middle East Company last fall.

How we got to know our student

We initially met last year in July, at the stewardesses’ party, organized by us on the occasion of the How to be cabin crew 1st anniversary. Soon after, in August, D. became our student at one of the preparation courses held by us monthly. She came to the course, got herself prepared, started to apply to the majority of the airlines recruiting in Romania (namely Qatar Airways, Etihad Airways, Ryanair and Flynas), and she was even recruited by three of them. Finally, she came to realize Etihad Airways is the company that suits her best.

Why cabin crew and not any other job?

I have chosen this job because, in my vision, is the only one that combines/merges/mixes up two essential things: the necessary with the pleasure. It doesn’t have the features of a normal job and I personally love everything which is out of the ordinary.

When did you decide to fly?

It was only this year when I’ve made up my mind that I want to fly. Being on my last year of university, studying foreign languages and having to interact with people of different nationalities and cultures, made be become more and more curious about how far I could go in order to succeed.

How did the interview with Etihad Airways go?

The interview went in a relaxed and natural manner. At every step, I felt continuously encouraged by the recruiters to be myself and speak freely. They acted kindly and funnily during the entire interview process and this permitted me to make a joke, while solving the ’’get to know each other’’ task. I was the sixty-six number and after introducing myself, following their model, I told them: ’’I’m lucky no 66 and I think I’m missing a six’’, which eased the atmosphere and stole them a smile along with a nice comment. The final interview, which occurred the next day, was peppered with smiles and jokes from their part. They warmly welcomed me, telling me I could relax, that the worst part had passed and a discussion was going to follow, so they could know me better. They asked me different types of questions: whether I have worked before in UAE or not, about me missing home and my knowledge regarding the Muslim culture, why Etihad, to tell them about a positive and a negative event concerning my customer service experience, whether I could adapt to an unusual work schedule, about what would be in my opinion the hardest thing for me to do, and the list goes on. The interview ended with a ‘see you soon’, which gave me the hope that everything went well.

You are among the lucky ones selected by more than one airline, following the interview. Why did you choose Etihad Airways?

It’s true that I’ve attended four interviews until now: Ryanair; Qatar; Etihad; Flynas and also that I’ve successfully obtained the cabin crew position with three of them. I chose Etihad Airways because of their open-mindedness and the opportunity to fly in almost every part of the world.

In what measure do you think what you’ve learned during the How to be cabin crew course helped you with the interview?

To participate in such a course was one of the most beautiful experiences. I had the pleasure to meet the team at the stewardesses’ cocktail and I was truly in love with the way the whole event was organized, the idea itself that there are people who really want to help us, and there were also guests who came particularly to speak us. This thing determined me to choose to come to the preparation course and, even if I wasn’t scared about my English or how I should act when it comes to customer service, I had great lacks concerning grooming and attitude.

I have learned how to temper myself, correct my mistakes, look at least almost perfect on the day of the interview, and all this due to the incredible way I’ve succeeded to combine through practice and attention the things learned at course. It was a relaxed atmosphere, the group games were a pleasure, and the attention given by the team to every one of us was priceless. Anca was always attentive to our way of expressing ourselves in English, Nicoleta was challenging us with different and different questions, and Georgiana was monitoring our every movement, so that everything could go well in the end. The most beautiful part of this course was that I managed to keep in touch with the How to be cabin crew team. On this occasion, I would like to thank them from the bottom of my soul for my success.

How do you see relocating/re-homing to a Muslim country? What do you think about Abu Dhabi?

I am amazed about the idea of new and I see relocating as a challenge, both from cultural and gastronomical point of view. Abu Dhabi is a luxurious and rich town, the high temperatures enchant me, as I love the warm weather, and this constitutes an advantage of the town. I hope the accommodation will be easy, although I am sure I will miss my family and friends I love so much. But now it’s my time to grow and do what I have always dreamt, to travel.

What is your advice for those ready to attend an interview?

My advice for those who want a career as cabin crew is to read with attention the interview requirements and the opinions of those who have already participated in an interview, concerning the questions and tasks required, to practice their English, and for a full success, to join a How to be cabin crew preparation course (the following day everything will seem to them easier, and to me, the individual feedback offered is priceless). Yet, the most important thing is the smile, along with a little bit of personality, and they will surely not fail.

Join us on an exclusive 4 day training course. We’ll share everything you need to know to pass the cabin crew interview stages, we will edit your perfect CV and take professional pictures for your online application. At the end of the course, you will be fully prepared for the interview. Book your seat now! 

Future cabin crew: ’’It was thanks to you that I regained the trust in myself’’

We met Raluca in September 2014, at one of our cabin crew courses. Raluca is the sort of girl happy most of the time, kind and friendly to those around her. However, she came to the course with a huge problem: the lack of confidence in herself. She was constantly saying that she wouldn’t pass the interview, being almost always overwhelmed by the emotions she couldn’t control, and also that her English level is not the best. To say the truth, she did express some emotions, but during the course she has learned how to surpass them and look with confidence into recruiters’ eyes. About her English, at that time she was already good enough at speaking it, and the written tests only confirmed us that her level was well above average. Once again, the lack of trust in herself made her see things much worse than they were in reality.

What happened with Raluca? In October, she attended an interview with one of the Middle East companies, successfully passed all of the tests, reached the final interview, and on the 1st of January, she received her DOJ. (Date of Join – the day on which she will fly to her new “home”). And she wasn’t the only one who made it, as her colleagues from the preparation course will be her colleagues there too. All of them have passed the interview they were so afraid of.cabin crew preparation
This is what Raluca has written to us about her experience at the course and the impact the interview preparation had on her:

’’What could be greater than a feedback along with good news?
You are wonderful, I will always be grateful to you, due to you I regained the trust in myself, I surpassed my fears, I continued to dream until my dream came true.

When I found out about the How to be cabin crew course, I told to myself that I MUST join it. Based on what you read on the Internet, some articles and opinions really conflict with each other, nothing seemed concrete to me anymore, when I was just getting an idea about something, soon I was finding myself reading something else and this whole thing got me confused.
Four intensive days. Every day was something special. We had a new guest every day. With each day passing, we were closer to our dream.

We had the honour of spending three of the days with the trainer, a great lady with more than ten years of experience in aviation, both as a flight attendant and a recruiter. The trainers amazed us with their experiences and advices, as well as Aida Chivu, the HR Specialist, who taught us that what we may consider our weaknesses, may be perceived by the others as qualities.

Getting to know people who work in this field is fantastic. Hearing their stories is amazing/enchanting/touching. Receiving their advices is priceless!
We have been through all of the stages of the recruitment interview, we insisted there where it was necessary, we have learned that even the smallest details matter. At the end, we received a feedback – so that every one of us be aware of the things that still require hard work and practice. In just four days we have met different people, every one special in his own way, we have built friendships…☺

On the third day of the course, we found out that in less than a month an important Middle East company would come to recruit in Romania. I still remember Anca, standing at the desk, with a smile on her lips, timidly interrupting us from the presentation and telling us about ‘the big news’. For more than ten minutes the whole room was covered in excitement, in the air you could feel emotion, agitation and impatience. It seemed like everyone became even more concentrated.
At the moment, many of us who attended the cours in September are very close to our dreams. Ther
e’s so little tim…and we are optimistic!

cabin crew preparationTherefore, Anca and Georgiana, I thank you for everything, thank you for pushing us hard, for encouraging us, for teaching us! Thank you for those four amazing days! Congratulations and keep up the good work!’’

May your sky be bright, Raluca!

Join us on an exclusive 4 day training course. We’ll share everything you need to know to pass the cabin crew interview stages, we will edit your perfect CV and take professional pictures for your online application. At the end of the course, you will be fully prepared for the interview. Book your seat now! 

Flight attendant: ’Every day in the uniform I want to make it an experience to remember’’

At the beginning of 2014, we heard the story of three friends who wished to become flight attendants, dreaming one day they will meet together in Paris and drink their coffee near the Eiffel Tower. After joining the How to be cabin crew course, the three friends have become flight attendants and will soon meet in Paris for real.

We met Gabriela, one of them, in February 2014 during the Preparation Course for the Interview with an Airline. She had a tattoo, 28-year-old, many emotions, but despite all these, she was ready to become a stewardess.

‘’I educated myself to reach for the moon; even if I miss, I’ll land among the stars.’’

When and why did you decide you want to become a flight attendant?

Although it looks like a cliché, I’ve wanted to practice this job since I was a teenager. Unfortunately, life’s way made me choose another path – namely customer care. At a moment when I was wishing to change my life, I received a surprise: I was put in the situation to choose whether to follow the Aviation School courses or not. The decision wasn’t hard, but at the same time it was an act of courage. Throughout the years, I educated myself to reach for the moon; even if I miss, I’ll land among the stars. Now I can say I’m closer to them than ever. I chose to make a radical change thinking it could be the biggest change of my life. And, with each day passing, I get more and more convinced I took the right decision.

How did your interview go?

The interview seemed to me quite easy, taking into account that I’ve attended the How to be cabin crew course, where I’ve received all the necessary information and practiced various exercises. I knew I was ready and I was sure of myself (I’ve practiced my presentation many times, in the car, while driving). We had to pass a written test too: the first subject was consisting of some English grammar exercises, and the second one was requiring us to imagine we were on board and had to present the new menu; it was then that I realized the imagination was the key. It seemed it was also the winner. After the test, the selected candidates remained for the one-to-one interviews. I’ve received numerous questions: about the airline, about me and my current workplace, motivation for this job, unpleasant situations at the workplace and solutions found. At the end, a text was read to me and I had to answer some questions based on it, so they could test my attention. I answered sincerely during all the interview process, adding a personal note. I refused to give standard answers we all find on Google.

The Qatar Airways rules
  • During the 12 hours of rest before being transported by bus to the airport for duty (duty = flight or airport standby), you are allowed to leave the house for 90 minutes.
  • You cannot use the phone or use any electronic device when you’re on the bus to and from work.

Read all about Qatar Airways rules

Was it helpful for your interview all that you have learned during the How to be cabin crew course?

All that I have learned during the course was of great help. I have learned how to introduce myself at a job interview, received information about a flight attendant’s life experience, and had the occasion to put into practice possible situations encountered at an interview. We’ve received useful advices based on the performance of each of us and discovered how to structure the CV in order to highlight what’s important. I’ve learned how to build my answers by inserting words that could capture the interviewer’s attention. Lastly, I’ve found out how to be confident about myself and my knowledge. I’ve left the course happy that I had the chance to meet three wonderful persons, part of the How to be cabin crew team, whom I admire for all their passion put in creating this project.

What is your advice for those who are going to attend an interview?

To have faith in their own dream! And patience! No matter how skilled you are, the interviews aren’t at all comfortable. A lot of practice is required: in front of the mirror, in the car, in front of two or three friends. Besides, I think if you put soul in your answers and really believe in your passion for this job, then you took a step forward (leaving your future colleagues behind).

I remember you had a tattoo on the wrist. What happened to it?

You are right. The tattoo was on the right hand’s ring finger. After five sessions of laser tattoo removal, taken in Bucharest, I got it removed completely.

Every day in the uniform I try to make it an experience to remember/unforgettable experience. 

One day I made a child happy. During boarding, while I was helping passengers with their luggage, one child took my hand telling me he was knowing the captain. He confirmed captain’s name and told me he was in the same football team as captain’s son. Once the embarkation was completed, while waiting for the flight documents, I announced the captain about that little passenger claiming he was his son’s colleague and knew him. The captain invited the child to the flight deck, explained to him technical details and took a photo together. During the flight, the child stopped me to thank me, telling me how proud he was about the photo. You could see the happiness on his face.

How did relocating to London seem to you?

In spite of the rain that looks romantic to me, I never thought I would wish to live in London. When I found out the name of my base, my best friend told me there would be no other place to better admire the clouds and the rain than London. At the beginning, it was quite hard to find an accommodation, but God brought in my way a great family, with whom I currently live. The environment is very pleasant, I adapted rapidly and I feel safe now. I’ve known people of different cultures from all over the world and I’m glad I have something to learn from everyone. I’ve also met extraordinary people who have heard about Romania, wish to visit it and speak fine words about our country. And, even I find it nice to live in London, my cabin crew bag has a little tricolor ribbon attached to it (idea stolen from another Romanian colleague).

What are your future plans?

In the near future, I would like to attend the required courses in order to become a pilot. The time spent in the air looks like a magical one to me. The sky is the place where I find my answers and from where I get the necessary energy for starting new things. I wish one day I will live in France and work for Air France. I’ve flirted with the idea of practicing this job in conflict areas, but those who care for me want me to be courageous on the ground.

SilkAir Takes to the Skies in a Sophisticated New Look

After 26 years in the air, SilkAir launched a new collection of uniforms in April, for its over 500 cabin crew, embracing a chic new style. Rolling out on all flights on 15 April 2015, the new one-piece uniform comes in two variations – aqua-blue for junior crew and a plum-red version for senior crew.

Both variations of the uniform are accompanied by a dark blue skirt, creating deeper synergies with the image of SilkAir’s parent company, Singapore Airlines. The interplay of bright and dark colours creates a classy appeal that pairs with a touch of vibrancy to reflect a youthful liveliness that customers can expect. At the same time, an asymmetric neckline gives a polished and refined look with a touch of modernity and style. Synonymous with SilkAir’s high standards of service, the sleeve pleats mirror SilkAir’s attention to detail and thoughtful service with a touch of surprise, and the seagull patterned georgette bow pin artistically represents the airline’s signature logo, with a fine touch of sophisticated femininity silkair-new-colours-5 .

 

Commenting on the new look, Mr Leslie Thng, Chief Executive of SilkAir said, “The SilkAir cabin crew are our ambassadors, and their uniforms a representation of the SilkAir brand and the warm service that differentiates our airline. After 11 years with the current style, this uniform change marks a milestone for us as we present a look which further aligns with our role as the regional wing of Singapore Airlines, providing connectivity to 48 leisure and business destinations in the Asia Pacific region. The new design captures exactly what our brand stands for today – a blend of style and sophistication with a touch of modernity consistent with the changing times. It symbolises our goal of making every point of our customers’ experiences on-board an absolute ‘Joy to Fly’.

The new uniform collection was created by local fashion designer, Alexandria Chen, a NAFA graduate who established her namesake collection, “Alexandria Chen” in 2012 and has designed uniform collections for various established hospitality brands. She said, “When designing the new uniforms, the aesthetics were just as important a consideration as the practicality of the design. The new SilkAir uniform is stylishly cut and fitted with a defined waistline which makes it easy to wear, flexible and comfortable, allowing cabin crew the ease of movement as they carry out their duties.”

The latest uniform design marks SilkAir’s fourth uniform change over 26 years. Its first uniform was the seagull motif dress by home-grown designer, Celia Loe, reflecting SilkAir’s image as a resort airline in the early 1990s. In 1994, SilkAir adopted a Balenciaga designed uniform, comprising a floral blouse, skirt and fitted jacket which echoed SilkAir’s expansion in the market and focus to reach out to business travellers in addition to holidaymakers. A decade later, in 2004, SilkAir launched the current one-piece wrap dress with an oriental design created by its own cabin crew.

silkair-new-colours-1

 

About SilkAir

As the regional wing of Singapore Airlines, SilkAir operates the Singapore Airlines Group’s narrowbody fleet and extends the Group network by seeding and developing new, exciting destinations in Asia Pacific.

The airline took to the skies in February 1989 as Tradewinds the Airline, before evolving into SilkAir in 1992. In its early days, the airline catered to passengers holidaying in exotic destinations in the region, including Phuket and Tioman. As the carrier developed, regional business destinations such as Phnom Penh, Yangon and Kuala Lumpur were added.

Today, the full service airline operates more than 350 weekly flights to 48 destinations in 12 countries. Recent additions to the network include Hangzhou (June 2014) and Denpasar (December 2014). SilkAir will also commence operations to Cairns on 30 May 2015. The airline currently has a fleet of 27 aircraft, comprising 5 A319s,13 A320s and 9 Boeing 737-800s. In August 2012, the airline announced the largest order in its history of up to 68 Boeing 737 aircraft, with firm orders comprising 23 Boeing 737-800s and 31 Boeing 737 MAX 8s.

Join us on an exclusive 4 day training course. We’ll share everything you need to know to pass the cabin crew interview stages, we will edit your perfect CV and take professional pictures for your online application. At the end of the course, you will be fully prepared for the interview. Book your seat now! 

Qatar Cabin crew

The Qatar Airways rules

 There is a specific list of rules you need to follow while working as cabin crew for Qatar Airways. Here are some of the most important ones:

  • You must get home before 4 am, even if you’re free the day after.

While I worked at Qatar Airways the time you could leave home wasn’t mentioned. I sometimes would arrive from a desert picnic at 3 am and go back to the camping two hours later; I would normally make pancakes for my friends during the two hours spent inside. It was thought that, after dawn,you could go out, especially since most of the crew thought that was the coolest period of the day and most suitable for running. And that was the time for the first prayer of the day (for our fellow Muslims) also.

  • During the 12 hours of rest before being transported by bus to the airport for duty (duty = flight or airport standby), you are allowed to leave the house for 90 minutes.

As I owned a car, I used to go and watch even only 2 basketball quarters, because it helped me disconnect, walk around the mall or visit acquaintances.

  • You are not allowed to wear jeans (the black, decent ones are accepted though) inside the office, technical building, aviation clinic or while travelling with Qatar Airways.

You must always dress business attire, and the girls’ skirt shouldn’t let their knees in sight. To these places you travel either by company taxi or by car that may be driven by your father, husband or brother.

  • Your father or brother cannot live in the same building with female flight attendants while on holiday.

I made a special request in the office so as, during my 4 consecutive days off, I could stay at the hotel with my family, and some other time I could go for a few days and live with my parents at some friends’ house. Of course I filled in all the details about the place I was staying in.

  • You cannot use the phone or use any electronic device when you’re on the bus to and from work.

The explanation is, while in uniform, you must maintain a professional image of the entire crew. Of course if you were last or first on the bus, you could send a message or make a call, provided you were not seen / heard by colleagues. The bus drivers were always very understanding.

  • You are not allowed to have alcohol, tobacco or pork products inside your home, and lately, candles have also been prohibited.

The explanation for alcohol, tobacco and pork products is obvious, and candles were banned because of a number of fire inside the houses.

  • You cannot distribute pictures of yourself in uniform on the internet.

  • You cannot distribute pictures of yourself in company of other crew members or friends where cigarettes or alcohol appear.

  • You cannot distribute pictures of yourself in a bathing suit.

It is believed that people know you’re a Qatar Airways flight attendant and the company’s image can be affected by how you display yourself on various social sites.

  • During flights you are not allowed to have religious or political debates with passengers or colleagues or gossip about your management team.

“I found out from another flight attendant that on flight XYZ, the Chief Cabin Crew reported a flight attendant for chewing gum.” – NO! There have been cases of the Chief Cabin Crew or even flight attendants who have reported episodes of “gossiping”.

  • A flight attendant is not allowed to chew gum!

  • When a flight attendant finds out she is pregnant, she must resign immediately.

  • To get married you need approval from the top management (the CEO) and you are given consent only if you have been with the company for at least five years.

  • You may receive visitors of the opposite sex in your apartment only between 7:00-22:00, and on entering the building they must identify by a residential certificate or passport with the security staff at the entrance.

The ID number is written in a register and the person must sign both for the entry and the exit of the building. At the same time, you, as the host, must open the door using your flight attendant identification (ID), so that the system knows if you receive visitors while at home. By having to do so, the office may spot if you break another rule that says you are not allowed to receive visitors during the 12-hour minimum rest before duty or home standby ( duty is considered not only flying, but also a course or standby duty at home or at the airport.)

Concerning the grooming (uniform + appearance) we had strict rules on colour shades that may be used for the make-up of the eyes and lips, varying on the colour of the uniform. Four products were a must for each flight: mascara, foundation, lipstick and nail polish coordinated to the colour of the lipstick. Before every flight, a grooming officer checks every flight attendant’s appearance.

You might think there are too many rules, but with time they become part of you. When I returned home, the first time I went out with my friends, at 2:30 in the morning I was checking my clock as I was used to being at home at 3:30. Arriving home at 5 am was a real event for me, I even posted that on Facebook.

Although having all these rules, I must say that cabin crew members find all sorts of ingenious methods to avoid them once in a while.

Join us on an exclusive 4 day training course. We’ll share everything you need to know to pass the cabin crew interview stages, we will edit your perfect CV and take professional pictures for your online application. At the end of the course, you will be fully prepared for the interview. Book your seat now!

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